Julia Jones, Professor of Geography, and Richard Settersten, Professor of Human Development, are Oregon State University’s 2021 University Distinguished Professor honorees. Professors Jones and Settersten each make unique and highly impactful contributions to OSU, the nation, and the world through their scholarship, creative work, teaching and mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students.

Drs. Jones and Settersten will deliver lectures via Zoom on May 5 and 6 at 5:30 pm.

Julia Jones, 2021 University Distinguished Professor of Geography

Lecture: May 6, 2021 at 5:30 p.m. via zoom. Register here

Professor Jones teaches Geography in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences. She develops novel data analysis methods for studying questions related to human impact on the environment, with a specific focus on forest landscapes, water, and resource management. Her record includes exemplary teaching, mentoring of students and young faculty, and administrative service widely across OSU. She contributes regularly to national and international policy debates and her research has attracted over $31M in grants to OSU, with many projects focusing on the synthesis of ecosystem responses to human perturbation and global change and integrating research, training, and interdisciplinary collaboration.

Richard Settersten, 2021 University Distinguished Professor of Human Development

Lecture May 5, 2021 at 5:30 p.m. via zoom. Register here

Professor Settersten is Head of the School of Social and Behavioral Health Sciences in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences. Holder of the Barbara E. Knudson Endowed Chair in Family Policy, he is an internationally recognized expert in the field of human development and one of the leading life course scholars in the world. His book, Not Quite Adults, is a seminal work on the modern transition to adulthood. His new book, Living on the Edge, reveals how members of the 1900 generation navigated the revolutionary changes of the 20th century, bringing significant lessons for lives today. He is the recipient of the 2019 Distinguished Lifetime Career Award by the Society for the Study of Human Development, a leading U.S. professional organization in his field.